Jessie-Jess

Boiling oatmeal on Sabbath...

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Someone told me that he/she thought Ellen White wrote or said that the extent to which we should be cooking on Sabbath is only as far as boiling a pot of oatmeal. Back in Ellen White's day, oatmeal probably took a lot longer to prepare and cook, so I figured that such a statement would allow for quite a bit of cooking these days. 

But I finally got around to looking up that statement and didn't find it. In fact, there's no evidence in her writings that she supports such a statement. In fact, the opposite is true, and in harmony with the Bible. What she really says is that we shouldn't do any boiling or baking on Sabbath, and that is Biblically supported.

Here is what Ellen White really wrote on the subject:

"The Lord is no less particular now in regard to his Sabbath, than when he gave the foregoing special directions to the children of Israel. He required them to bake that which they would bake, and seethe (that is, boil) that which they would seethe, on the sixth day, preparatory to the rest of the Sabbath. Those who neglect to prepare for the Sabbath on the sixth day, and who cook food upon the Sabbath, violate the fourth commandment, and are transgressors of God's law. All who are really anxious to observe the Sabbath according to the commandment, will not cook any food upon the Sabbath. They will, in the fear of that God who gave his law from Sinai, deny themselves, and eat food prepared upon the sixth day, even if it is not so palatable. God forbade the children of Israel's baking and boiling upon the Sabbath. That prohibition should be regarded by every Sabbath-keeper, as a solemn injunction from Jehovah to them. The Lord would guard his people from indulging in gluttony upon the Sabbath, which he has set apart for sacred meditation and worship.  {1SP 225.2}  
     The Sabbath of the Lord is a day of rest from labor; and the diet upon that day should be more simple, and partaken of in less quantities, than upon the six laboring days, because we do not have that exercise upon the Sabbath that we have upon the other days of the week. Many have erred in not practicing self-denial upon the Sabbath. By partaking of full meals, as on the six laboring days, their minds are beclouded; they are stupid, and often drowsy; some suffer with headache. Such have no truly-devotional feelings upon the Sabbath, and the blessing resting upon the Sabbath does not prove a blessing to them. The sick and suffering require care and attention upon the Sabbath, as well as upon the other six days of the week; and it may be necessary for their comfort to prepare warm food and drinks upon the Sabbath. In such instances, it is no violation of the fourth commandment to make them as comfortable as possible. The great Lawgiver is a God of compassion, as well as of justice.  {1SP 226.1}"  

My suggestion: If you would like to have oatmeal on Sabbath, may I suggest boiling it ahead of time, dressing it up (flavoring it however you would like it) and serving it chilled on Sabbath morning? It's quite delicious chilled. Try it with soy, almond, or coconut milk (or a combination) and blueberries, or with peanut butter. It's quite palatable. 

Edited by Jessie-Jess

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This does not imply we are to eat cold food on Sabbath morning, or Sabbath meals.

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I have read her statement that on a cold day already prepared food can be warmed up <--putting it into my own words, pretty much. But chilled oatmeal is yummy. Cold cereal, such as granola, is also yummy. 

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In the day  of microwaves and computerized ovens one can often prepare a boiled or baked food in less time than it would take to put palatable food on the table that was not boiled or baked.

Remember what it took, in the early days of EGW, to boil or bake food.

I suspect that most people today do not have to build a wood fire in their cook stove in order to boil or bake.

Just as most people today do not  have to build a wood fire to  heat the water for  a bath and most families do not bathe in the same bath water in a tub placed in the kitchen.

Really, how much work is it today to bake a potato on the Sabbath?  Much less than in the time of EGW I can assure you.

Many years ago, as a  single parent who also worked full time I attended a congregation that had a potluck every week.  And I contributed extensively.

Once a woman challenged me when she learned that I had brought something that had been baked that Sabbath morning.  I asked/reminded her:

1) That during certain times of  the year, I would not have any time after I arrived home from work to prepare food for Sabbath before sundown.

2) I gave her the exact number of minutes that I had devoted to baking my  item that morning.  [NOTE:  It was not a frozen item that I bought at a store.]

3) I asked her to tell me the number of minutes that she had spent that morning in preparing her not baked and not boiled food.

Well, at that point she shut up.

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my view is there is a preparation day.  And what we can do in preparation ahead of time frees us, frees our time during the Sabbath.

Yes God is with us in the Sabbath hours in a special way,  and The Lord wants us to be available to Him.

when i go on a picnic generally i bring prepared food so most of the time can be spent tuning into nature and a great social time.  i usually don't bring raw potatoes and picked onions and fresh eggs and cucumbers, to make potato salad.

We do live in a time of instant food.  Making instant mashed potatoes is not something i do often, but when i need them fast, now and then, it works.

Preparation, even having in mind ahead of time what i am going to eat, and what i am going to wear... leaves me more available during those precious hours of infinite blessings.  but if i am helping at a church potluck there can be hours of kitchen clean up time and floor sweeping etc.  Then I am in sweet fellowship with The Lord in the Sabbath hours serving others.  

And i never feel i have done a perfect preparation, but i do have a perfect God who fills me with His blessings as much as i can receive every Sabbath.

i have known Sabbath keepers to begin labor for the Sabbath feast early Sabbath morning and stop only during church services, laboring hours and hours to serve a grand Sabbath feast....because ti was expected to be served to properly celebrate Sabbath with elaborate roasts and pies etc.  so there are all kinds of views on this.

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Sabbath is a day where things shouldn't be business as usual.  For many, balancing a very busy schedule the rest of the week makes eating and preparing meals just more of a busy work-filled time, and not so much of a time for a relaxed time to actually enjoy a meal with family and friends.  That is especially true since both men and women work outside of the home.  Coming home after a day of work and working to prepare a full meal is just a lot more work.  I think times may have changed somewhat since EGW wrote that advice.  Meal preparation was more work and the women typically were the ones spending much of the day doing it.  Now less so.

Increasingly in the modern era eating is recreational, a culinary experience,  entertainment even.  Cooking and preparing meals can be a big part of that experience, and for many it is a time to enjoy and share with others that experience.  I think the Sabbath spirit really is consistent with that view of eating and meals. It is a time to share a meal, preparation, and eating in an unhurried relaxed way.  If viewed as such, the notions of worrying about whether we are "working" on Sabbath tend to diminish in significance.  

JoeMo likes this

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I have no problem cooking simple meals on Sabbath.  I enjoy cooking, plus it gives my wife a little break.  So what if the dishes sit in the sink until Sunday morning?

I also have no problem going out to eat on Sabbath.  It gives our whole family a break; and going out to eat is hardly "business as usual" for us.

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:flower:What! You don't clean up your own mess! For a whole day!!

Edited by CoAspen

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This reminds me that when I was a child we were required to have our baths taken before sundown on Friday night.

 

Nowadays, bathing daily includes a shower on Sabbath.

 

I guess it's one's attitude that counts.

 

 

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And taking a shower is hardly the time consuming activity and work that taking a bath was even back in the days of our childhood and certainly far less than in the 19th Century and before.  For most of us, taking a shower doesn't take much more time and effort than getting dressed, brushing our teeth and combing our hair.  To say that we shouldn't do that on Sabbath is as silly as the burdensome man-made Jewish Sabbath rules that got Jesus cross-wise with the Pharisees.

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I know one pastor's wife that requires the potluck food to be brought to the church prepared and warmed already to lessen the burden on those scheduled to oversee the potluck. 

Whateve works- Yes, I thank God that we don't need to haul wood AND water to prepare a bath or even make oatmeal! 

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We as Adventists do have a tendency to compare the amount of work done then to the amount of work it takes today, and also to compare what takes more work, what is less work, etc. The Bible says, "thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates:" (Exodus 20:10, KJV, last part)

Work is work. The commandments were written by God's own finger in stone, meaning they are unchangeable. This is not the place to be debating what's appropriate on Sabbath. Take it up with the Lord. Reason with the Bible. Reason with God. Take it up with Him if you have a problem with what I posted, for what I posted is counsel given by Him and part of a law written by His finger. 

 

Besides, in the event that you might be wrong, would you want to influence someone else to break the Sabbath also, or encourage that person to break the Sabbath, or reason with someone who might be convicted not to bake on Sabbath, to bake on Sabbath anyway, even when there is no approval shown in Scripture for doing so? Would you, in trying to justify what you do on Sabbath, lead someone off the path that God has set for them, and away from those things that God has made clear from them? If you do something on Sabbath that the Bible says not to do, or that Ellen White (who God revealed the importance of the Sabbath to) says not to do on Sabbath, then it's really something you need to talk to the Lord about and share with God, not other people.

 

If you are right, that's between you and God.

"Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbathdays:" (Colossians 2:16, KJV) 

If you are justified in God's eyes, let it be and do what you believe is best. If you are not justified in God's eyes, don't lead other people astray either. It's not good to debate on these sensitive subjects or to try to justify what you do on Sabbath, when it may be a stumbling block for someone else.

 

Edited by Jessie-Jess
Green Cochoa and Aliensanctuary like this

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Well, when I brought Kimchi to  that potluck, I did prepare it several weeks ahead of time.  I would bring it several times a year.  When I did bring it, the whole congregation knew before church began that they would have the opportunity to sample that tasty treat again.   :)  

 

 

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i have known Sabbath keepers to begin labor for the Sabbath feast early Sabbath morning and stop only during church services, laboring hours and hours to serve a grand Sabbath feast....because ti was expected to be served to properly celebrate Sabbath with elaborate roasts and pies etc.  so there are all kinds of views on this.

"While cooking upon the Sabbath should be avoided, it is not necessary to eat cold food. In cold weather let the food prepared the day before be heated. And let the meals, though simple, be palatable and attractive. Provide something that will be regarded as a treat, something the family do not have every day." -   {Child Guidance, by Ellen G. White 532.2}  

"The Sabbath of the Lord is a day of rest from labor; and the diet upon that day should be more simple, and partaken of in less quantities, than upon the six laboring days, because we do not have that exercise upon the Sabbath that we have upon the other days of the week. Many have erred in not practicing self-denial upon the Sabbath. By partaking of full meals, as on the six laboring days, their minds are beclouded; they are stupid, and often drowsy; some suffer with headache. Such have no truly-devotional feelings upon the Sabbath, and the blessing resting upon the Sabbath does not prove a blessing to them. The sick and suffering require care and attention upon the Sabbath, as well as upon the other six days of the week; and it may be necessary for their comfort to prepare warm food and drinks upon the Sabbath. In such instances, it is no violation of the fourth commandment to make them as comfortable as possible. The great Lawgiver is a God of compassion, as well as of justice."  {Ellen White The Spirit of Prophecy, Volume 1226.1}

 The same and similar counsel is found in others of her writings.

God has commanded us in Scripture not to work, to prepare what we will prepare the day ahead. Nowhere in Scripture does He permit us to go ahead and prepare a large feast on Sabbath. If I am wrong, show me. Ellen White confirms this and even gives the reasons. The work done to prepare a large feast is unnecessary and should not be done on Sabbath. 

Besides, if we followed the health counsel, our meals would be more simple anyway. We could prepare haystacks and have everything ready ahead of time. Someone could bring sliced tomatoes, someone lettuce, someone chips, someone beans, etc, all prepared ahead of time. Fruit and vegetable trays can be elegant and beautiful for a feast/celebration. We should have something special, but we shouldn't let this "something special" for Sabbath cause us to violate Sabbath by working hard to make that something special and prepare for that something special on Sabbath.

 

And why are we working to clean up the potluck and spending hours cleaning up? Is there nobody designated to clean the church during the week? Do other members simply eat and run, and not grab a wash cloth or something to help clean up? Do people not take care of their own dishes? If we Adventists had more consideration for those setting up and taking down potluck, and helped out, and took our dishes home to wash after Sabbath, then no one should need to spend hours cleaning up afterward.  

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However we walk during the Sabbath, it is not proper Sabathkeeping that saves us.

And however we grow in learning and changing in how we observe the Sabbath it is the Lord of the Sabbath who walks with us and in us, who is the center of the Sabbath, not food, not grooming, not rules.  These have their place, but if Jesus is not in the place he belongs in, in our hearts... all these Sabbath guidelines mean nothing.

Robert, rudywoofs (Pam) and JoeMo like this

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I believe that these Sabbath laws point us to the practices in the future Kingdom of God. Today, we wouldn't stone someone for gathering firewood on the Sabbath, but that is what happened in the days of Moses. Maybe to some, turning on a switch to heat food or generate light is work, or causes someone else to work.

In the Kingdom, we won't have to worry about what to do or not to do because it will all be programmed into our minds. If the Sabbath rest means total rest, including no cooking or warming food, it will be ok. If today we wish to try to acknowledge the Laws of Moses, given to him by God, we can adapt by eating simple foods such as sandwiches, salads, cereals, and fruit, dried or fresh, chips and dip, etc. It might be a little extreme to turn the power off and sit in a cold, dark house eating cold food.

I don't believe that the church potluck scenario in any way demonstrates the spirit of Sabbath rest in the days of Moses, the laws and practices of which, incidentally, more accurately represent the Kingdom of God than our religions of today.

Jessie-Jess likes this

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We came a long way about keeping the Sabbath holy. Back in 1960s, a minister was fired who used to take out his family on Fri. evenings saying eating out frees my wife from a chore and our entire family can enjoy the meal.

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I really believe that it is possible to prepare for Sabbath, especially if the whole family gets involved. Perhaps the wife and the husband both work, or the wife is busy supervising children, and maybe there's not enough time on Friday. Are they keeping up with chores during the week, cleaning up after themselves, for example, so that there's not a huge unnecessary mess to pick up on Sabbath? Food preparation can begin on Thursday. If the children are old enough to walk and talk and play, they should be old enough to help with the chores, and might even enjoy helping mama cook. There are many things that are easy to prepare that can be ready for Sabbath (though some things may require some warming up, such as lasagna or spaghetti) and even seen as a real treat.

Here's some examples of delicious dishes that can be prepared ahead of time:

salad: Add the dressing right before eating and it shouldn't be soggy, so long as you let the lettuce dry after washing it. You can also add the tomatoes later. 

home made macaroni and cheese: vegan or non-vegan, this is easy to make and can be both prepared and baked ahead of time. If you have a microwave, you can just pop it in the microwave, or you can re-heat it. Since the cheese sauce is pre-cooked and so are the noodles, you can mix them together and just heat it up in the oven the next day

lasagna, baked ziti, baked spaghetti, etc: similar to mac and cheese, while it may require a few more steps (layering, for the lasagna), it's very easy to make. The noodles can be pre-cooked and it can be layered ahead of time even if you don't want to bake it on Friday. I personally like leftover lasagna that was  baked the day before even better than freshly baked lasagna.

scalloped potatoes, cheesy potatoes, or au gratin: though maybe not as easy as the others

casseroles

For summer especially, potato, pasta or macaroni salads are easy to prepare and usually better the next day. 

Sandwiches: You can prepare the fixin's the day ahead and assemble them before eating them. If you have children it may be especially fun for them if you set out the ingredients buffet-style and let them put together the sandwich the way they want. 

Rice: In Thailand rice is left out on the counter in the summer heat and is usually still good the next day (if prepared in the evening about supper time and eaten by about lunch time), though it can spoil if left out too long and is not good by the third day. It'll stink when it's no good. For those who have a refrigerator, such as myself, rice is my usual Sabbath breakfast. I eat it like cold cereal, usually in coconut milk with honey to sweeten it, and dried and/or fresh fruit and some type of nuts or seeds. My favorite way is probably with peanut butter, fresh fruit, and small, ripe bananas. 

no-bake cookies: These can be made with healthy ingredients and sweetened with honey or dates instead of sugar, and can be eaten for breakfast. On a hot day, no-bakes straight from the freezer are a more appealing breakfast than a hot bowl of oatmeal anyway.

cold cereal: Who doesn't like it?

breakfast burritos: especially if you have leftover potatoes, scrambled eggs (or tofu), breakfast sausage, etc. You can wrap them in a tortilla and pop them in the microwave. Alternatively, you can make breakfast sandwiches. 

fruit salad: usually tastes better the next day

soup can be pre-cooked and re-heated the next day, and some soup or chili can even be prepared overnight in a crock pot. Overnight oatmeal and other slow cook dishes can also be made literally while you're sleeping (unless you're concerned about electrical fires)

dessert ideas:

pie: and if you don't want to make a home made pie, or don't have time, you can buy some jello instant pudding and make a jello pie, or you can just buy a pie from the store

crisp: can be made ahead of time, so can cobbler, cakes, cookies, and other desserts

 

Those are just a few ideas, some that I personally like. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Jessie-Jess said:

Here's some examples of delicious dishes that can be prepared ahead of time:

I'd like some Asian examples.  Keep in mind the following:

1) Cold rice is horrible.

2) Rewarmed rice is horrible.

3) Asians have no ovens, and especially none with timers.

4) Many Asians have no refrigerators.

5) Sandwiches are beyond the budget, even for a small family, and so much the more when feeding the church.

6) The climate in Asia does not lend itself to the keeping of any foods save for fresh fruits, which, again, are too expensive to be the sole food on Sabbath.

3 hours ago, Jessie-Jess said:

Rice: In Thailand rice is left out on the counter in the summer heat and is usually still good the next day (if prepared in the evening about supper time and eaten by about lunch time), though it can spoil if left out too long and is not good by the third day. It'll stink when it's no good. For those who have a refrigerator, such as myself, rice is my usual Sabbath breakfast. I eat it like cold cereal, usually in coconut milk with honey to sweeten it, and dried and/or fresh fruit and some type of nuts or seeds. My favorite way is probably with peanut butter, fresh fruit, and small, ripe bananas. 

Have you lived in Thailand?  They might cook the rice for breakfast and leave it out for lunch, and maybe supper, but anytime after that, it's sour for sure.  Rice must be cooked every day.  If it goes more than about 12 hours, especially during the warmer seasons, the "edge" on it is noticeable.  One could not reasonably keep the rice from 5 pm on Friday to 12 pm on Saturday (19 hours) and expect none of the guests to object to it, nor be sickened by it.  The reason folks leave rice out is because refrigerated rice becomes hard and inedible.  This, in fact, is precisely my question for God--what Asian food can reasonably be prepared on Friday?

There are a few foods that would keep.  If they weren't beyond my personal budget, they would all, nonetheless, be discouraging examples of Sabbath-keeping for the locals who could definitely not afford them.  For example, there is the possibility of eating only fruits.  Or one could eat sticky rice cooked in a "sealed" bamboo stick.  

Rice is not usually eaten alone.  Plain rice is more bland and insipid than most any other food on earth.  And the vegetables it is eaten with must be cooked, for sanitation reasons as well as for palatability.  However, even chopping up the vegetables beforehand, and putting them in the refrigerator, would be a disaster.  They spoil much, much faster when chopped, and look terrible with browned edges (green leafy vegetables, etc.).  The only vegetable that could reasonably be chopped ahead of time would be the carrots.  But carrots form only a small part of the diet around here, and are frequently absent from the "with rice" menu.  And, again, not everyone has a refrigerator.

I have wrestled with this question here, and, honestly, see no good answers for Asia.  I love your ideas for America--they just don't apply where I am.  We are church planting, and as many as 50% of those attending are non-Christians and/or non-Adventists.  The good food they eat with us for Sabbath lunch is one of the drawing cards, especially when some are poor students who have not had a good hot meal all week.  We cook.  If it's a sin, may God have mercy.

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One thing to remember that Jesus said:

"Then he said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. 28 So the Son of Man is Lord even of the Sabbath.” (Mark 2:26-28).  This tells me that God wants us to enjoy Sabbath.  If that involves hiking, driving somewhere, paying to get into a national park, or grilling burgers on the BBQ, So be it!

Is it possible that obsessing over what is work and what is not work can become a Sabbath-breaking activity in itself?  Is sitting in church worrying about your stock portfolio really keeping the Sabbath?  Is having a Bible study over lunch at Tofu'd really breaking the Sabbath?  I cook on Sabbath because for me cooking is fun (doing the dishes is DEFINITELY breaking Sabbath :scared:).

In Israel, elevators an some locations always stop on every floor on Sabbath because some people consider pushing an elevator button to be "work".

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Perhaps one reason the Sabbath command is the size it is is because of all the variables. Much is left to our discretion.

Nan likes this

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"If you keep your feet from trampling the Sabbath, from pursuing your own interests on my holy day, if you call the Sabbath a delight and the LORD's holy day honorable; and if you honor it by not going your own ways and seeking your own pleasure or speaking merely idle words, then you will take delight in the LORD, and he will make you ride upon the heights of the earth; and he will make you feast on the inheritance of your ancestor Jacob, your father. "Yes! The mouth of the LORD has spoken." -Isaiah 58: 13, 14 International Standard Version

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22 hours ago, Green Cochoa said:

I'd like some Asian examples.  Keep in mind the following:

1) Cold rice is horrible.

2) Rewarmed rice is horrible.

3) Asians have no ovens, and especially none with timers.

4) Many Asians have no refrigerators.

5) Sandwiches are beyond the budget, even for a small family, and so much the more when feeding the church.

6) The climate in Asia does not lend itself to the keeping of any foods save for fresh fruits, which, again, are too expensive to be the sole food on Sabbath.

Have you lived in Thailand?  They might cook the rice for breakfast and leave it out for lunch, and maybe supper, but anytime after that, it's sour for sure.  Rice must be cooked every day.  If it goes more than about 12 hours, especially during the warmer seasons, the "edge" on it is noticeable.  One could not reasonably keep the rice from 5 pm on Friday to 12 pm on Saturday (19 hours) and expect none of the guests to object to it, nor be sickened by it.  The reason folks leave rice out is because refrigerated rice becomes hard and inedible.  This, in fact, is precisely my question for God--what Asian food can reasonably be prepared on Friday?

There are a few foods that would keep.  If they weren't beyond my personal budget, they would all, nonetheless, be discouraging examples of Sabbath-keeping for the locals who could definitely not afford them.  For example, there is the possibility of eating only fruits.  Or one could eat sticky rice cooked in a "sealed" bamboo stick.  

Rice is not usually eaten alone.  Plain rice is more bland and insipid than most any other food on earth.  And the vegetables it is eaten with must be cooked, for sanitation reasons as well as for palatability.  However, even chopping up the vegetables beforehand, and putting them in the refrigerator, would be a disaster.  They spoil much, much faster when chopped, and look terrible with browned edges (green leafy vegetables, etc.).  The only vegetable that could reasonably be chopped ahead of time would be the carrots.  But carrots form only a small part of the diet around here, and are frequently absent from the "with rice" menu.  And, again, not everyone has a refrigerator.

I have wrestled with this question here, and, honestly, see no good answers for Asia.  I love your ideas for America--they just don't apply where I am.  We are church planting, and as many as 50% of those attending are non-Christians and/or non-Adventists.  The good food they eat with us for Sabbath lunch is one of the drawing cards, especially when some are poor students who have not had a good hot meal all week.  We cook.  If it's a sin, may God have mercy.

I've been living in Thailand for about 6 months now. We were in Bangkok during the hot season when the rice was cooked in the evening and left out in the rice cooker (which was not on to keep it warm) in a room that did not have air conditioning. It's true the rice wasn't always good by lunch time, and it's not an ideal method, but consider that the Israelites were in a similarly unfriendly climate with no refrigeration when God gave them the command to make what they would the day ahead. 

Cold rice is delicious and one of my favorite Sabbath meals. I regard it as a treat and often eat it for breakfast and for supper, and enjoy it the next day, too. I like it best with coconut milk and honey, peanut butter, bananas, and dried fruit. Yes, that can get expensive, but sometimes my budget is tighter. I've used other things, too. Fresh fruit, such as bananas, and cheaper "nuts" such as sunflower seeds and (my favorite besides peanuts/peanut butter) roasted pumpkin seeds, also work. I've also bought salads from the market that have kept fresh in the fridge for a day or two without getting nasty and brown. 

Asians have been making sushi and onigiri long before refrigeration. And you're right. I don't currently have an oven either. However, cold rice and no bake cookies are two of my favorites that I do make here in Thailand. Muesli is another one that is possible to prepare the day ahead with refrigeration. Without, it's easy enough to whip up that same day (Just pour some coconut milk over raw oats and add some fruit. There you go.). But, sadly, oats are expensive, which is one reason why my Sabbath treat, which I look forward to and enjoy, is usually cold rice. 

Fresh produce, including some fruits, are some of the most affordable items here in Thailand. When I just add up the fruits and vegetables for the week, it comes to less than $10 usually, when I buy at the market (and if you buy fruits that are in season and local fruits, you can get fruit for even less expensive than that). Quite often these days, fruit, vegetables, and noodles are my primary foods. 

For me, plain rice just needs a little sprinkle of salt and it's palatable. There are types of rice (some are more expensive) that don't taste as much like traditional rice as they do other grains (barley, rye?), and I can enjoy that cold without salt (though I still prefer salt and warm would be better). I've also made delicious steamed rice with leftover rice and vegetables. Everything, if you have refrigeration, can be prepared the day ahead. 

And if you have a refrigerator, there's also this delicious rice noodle salad. Cook some rice noodles, slice some cabbage and grate some carrots, and make a peanut butter sauce (look for a recipe). Grilled vegetables can also taste good chilled. I even saw a recipe recommended for barbecue parties (Yes, it was for America, but you can do it here, too. If you don't have a grill or griddle, I suppose you could try the wok.) Try frying some carrots in honey (use honey instead of oil). 

Cooking with a rice cooker is considerably less work than lighting a fire and standing over a cauldron to be sure that the fire doesn't burn the rice. You might be surprised what other delicious foods you can make in a rice cooker, too. Some of them might even keep better and be more enjoyable than the rice, if you can afford the ingredients (Cobbler/Crisp, anyone?). 

There is some cheap bread here in Thailand, but I prefer vegan bread so even though I did enjoy it for a while, I don't prefer it and would rather avoid it these days in favor of vegan bread (or what I hope is vegan bread), besides, at some point it gets a funny taste, like a baked avocado...and I don't like that taste...

Just because you can't see any good answers, doesn't mean you should discourage others from following their convictions. (No, I don't want you to actually answer me, because God is your judge, but here are some rhetorical questions for you and anyone else.) What are your real motives? Is it convenience and taste, or is it really about taking care of real hunger and tending to the needs of the poor? What has God already made clear about it? What were the conditions like in those days? Do you believe God can provide for you? Do you really think that just because you insist that there is only one way of doing things, that that is the only way, and that there are no other options? Should we make exceptions for everyone because of those who might be in circumstances that make them real exceptions, or should those who can possibly avoid cooking and washing dishes on Sabbath do so? Who are we to set the standards anyway? There's things God has made plain in His Word. Should we deviate from them? Should we put our own judgement above His? Do we know better than God does? 

Perhaps it isn't me that you should be arguing with. Take it to God and talk to Him about it. It may be that you're right, for people in certain circumstances that you mentioned, but that such justifications might lead others who are in better circumstances who can afford to avoid cooking on Sabbath and dish washing, while tending to their own hunger and the needs of others, would take those same justifications and work on Sabbath because of the "Well, they can do it, so why can't I?" Or should we be making such justifications at all?

I can't say whether you're right or wrong in some of those things (such as cooking to tend to the needs of the poor), but I can say that for a single missionary like myself, it's avoidable (at least when I'm at the studio, and even when I'm traveling and do eat with others, there are still some things I will not do, such as eat at a cafeteria, because I've worked at a cafeteria and know very well that we do more than is necessary on the Sabbath). For me, I can see how we can work around these things, and how these things can be avoided, so for me there is no excuse. 

But let's say I fully support cooking/washing dishes in some of those scenarios. In reality, it doesn't mean that it's supported in Heaven, because God is the judge. Let's say I condemn it all for any reason. It doesn't mean that it's condemned in Heaven, because God is the judge. So what has He said already? And if you have any further arguments or a need to be justified, talk to God about it.

(This post is not just for you, but for others, too.) 

 

 

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Here are some recipe ideas for preparing for Sabbath in Thailand. I have refrigeration, so of course I recommend that you refrigerate these (but some of these, even if you don't have refrigeration, can be prepared very quickly and easily, such as the cabbage salad.). 

Chinese Cabbage Salad: You can even crush the noodles ahead of time, but leave them out of the salad until it's time to serve. For this, I think it's better that the dressing is on the salad for a while first, so it should be better overnight, but I like the cabbage soggy.

Black Beans in Barbecue Sauce: I get it. Molasses is expensive here in Thailand, but you can make tomato or some other sauce instead, or maybe you can make a black bean curry. It can be prepared the day ahead, refrigerated, and then either warmed up or eaten cold. I found black beans for a good price at the market. 

Sweet Potato Dumplings: If you've been to a Chinese buffet in America, you've probably seen these. I made them in the USA, but sweet potatoes are pretty cheap here in Thailand, at least when in season. If available, may I recommend trying purple sweet potato if you can't find the orange sweet potato? If you don't have an oven, you can deep fry them in a wok. 

Because I'm feeling kind of tired and don't want to go through looking for one in particular, here's some examples of rice noodle salad (and rice noodles are a good price here in Thailand, I think). 

You could also put together a seaweed wrap with avocado and vegetables instead of making sandwiches, if you find that seaweed is cheaper/more convenient and if you like sushi. I don't care for it, but know that some love it. 

I'm planning on making a post about cold rice cereal one of these days. When it's ready, perhaps I'll post it here :3. 

 

 

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On May 24, 2016 at 7:45 PM, Jessie-Jess said:

Rice: In Thailand rice is left out on the counter in the summer heat and is usually still good the next day (if prepared in the evening about supper time and eaten by about lunch time), though it can spoil if left out too long and is not good by the third day.

 

48 minutes ago, Jessie-Jess said:

We were in Bangkok during the hot season when the rice was cooked in the evening and left out in the rice cooker (which was not on to keep it warm) in a room that did not have air conditioning. It's true the rice wasn't always good by lunch time, and it's not an ideal method, . . .

???

I have spent a lot of time in Thailand.  Your second statement is more accurate.  I have yet to see unrefrigerated cooked rice keep for three days, even if it is the Asian sticky rice (glutinous rice) which keeps a little better.  You may have witnessed a miracle with that one.

About the prices for things:

Molasses is unavailable where I am--I've never seen it.  Honey is nearly unavailable--at least, it is very difficult to find genuine honey.  Most "honey" around here tastes more like honey-flavored corn syrup to me, and it's too runny to keep if it were genuine.  (Real honey should have less than 18% moisture content in order to keep.)  If real honey were found, the price tag puts it at the level of a Christmas treat.  Maple syrup is worse.  I've drooled upon seeing some once in a specialty shop, but passed it by.  Jams are mostly gelatin, sugar, and pectin.  Not much real fruit.

Over 90% of fruit where I am seems to be imported.  The prices are likely double what you found in Bangkok, if not more.  For example, one kg. of longan costs about $2.50 (more than a dollar a pound).  That's in season right now, and not one of the "expensive" fruits like durian, mangosteen, lychee, grapes, apples, strawberries (if you can find them), and, well, most all fruits are expensive except for bananas here.  Mangos and papayas may be more moderately priced.  (Bananas are about $0.60 a comb--I don't know how many kg. that would be, but they're about 1/2 the size of the typical bananas sold in America.  That's the absolute cheapest fruit around.)

Furthermore, the economy here is very poor.  The locals I work among earn an average of about $120-150 a month as their total family income.  Some have told me they eat plain rice every other day, and only buy vegetables to go with their rice half the time because they're more expensive.  Believe it or not, perhaps because the meat is local and not imported, being a vegetarian is more expensive where I am.  I was not exaggerating the facts to say fruits were beyond the budget of the people among whom I labor.  How could I dare to teach them they should not cook on Sabbath when it would mean essentially one alternative: fasting?  Should I teach people they must fast on Sabbath?  And what of their children?  I, personally, could fast every Sabbath, if I felt God wished it of me--nevermind the fact that it is typically my hardest and least restful day of the week.  But I could not require such devotion of the not-yet-even-baptized members of our group, nor of the locals who have more difficult circumstances than me.

Ellen White made exception on the meat question for poor countries.  She made exception on the Sabbath question for doctors, for pastors, for emergencies.  Jesus did not criticize His disciples for harvesting grain upon the Sabbath to satisfy their hunger.  "The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath."

rudywoofs (Pam) likes this

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