The Wanderer

Tender Regard For The Elderly??

35 posts in this topic

What Does The Church teach about how to handle the elderly amongst us; and how is this actually playing out in society? What are the needs being met; what are the needs not being met?

In the book called Reflecting Christ, Ellen White wrote in chapter 266 a very pertinent scripture verse at the very beginning of this chapter that was about "Tender Regard For Elderly Workers;"

Quote

"'Rise up in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly and revere your God. I am the Lord.'" Leviticus 19:32, N.I.V.  {RC 280.1}  

I was a little surprised to see such a text in The Old Testament. I had a sort of mindset that told me this kind of stuff was only in The New Testament. I always thought that the problems we have now with aging and the elderly were more "modern-day problems," and I had never considered that the same problems have been going on for such a long time.

A really good example of what the problems with aging and the elderly can be seen in the following quote:

Quote

Mary Chase was the sister of James White. During his lifetime, he and Ellen had cared for his sister and Ellen had continued to care for James sister after James died. Ellen White felt that she could no longer bear this responsibility. She wrote to Mary’s daughter, Adelaine Savage, challenging her to fulfill her duty in caring for her mother. {DG 198.3}

Dear Niece, Adeline Savage:  I think you should know how your mother [Mary Chase] is at the present time. She is quite feeble. She has needed care constantly. I cannot possibly have any care of her whatever.{DG 198.4}
     
We leave Battle Creek for Otsego today. Next week we shall be, I expect, at Chicago. The eighth we start on our long journey for California. I feel very sad to leave your mother in her present state of feebleness. I provide for her the very best I can. I purchased a house, which has cost me a thousand dollars, and furnished it simply with necessary articles for her use. We have let a family into the house--a mother, son, and daughter. They have the use of the house [in exchange] for your mother's board. I pay the taxes. Last year your mother paid the taxes, but she met with an accident in building a fire in the stove. The floor took fire and there was seventy-five dollars expense to me for repairs.{DG 198.5}

The son of the widow lady who has my house has been sick for five weeks. During this time your mother has been sick, attended by a physician and sometimes a nurse, for she could not receive attention from anyone in the house. It was in the bargain that your mother's fire should be made in the morning so that she could have a warm room to get up in, but further than this they could not do.{DG 198.6}

If she needed a nurse, she must provide it. She has only three hundred dollars, which will melt away very soon. She must have clothing. She must have wood. I have done all I can do, and more than I should do. I look to you, her children and her grandchildren, to act your part. I feel bad indeed at the present appearance of things, that strangers' hands have to do for your mother the duties which justly belong to you to perform. When the neighbors and friends inquire, "Has she no children to have a care for her?" how embarrassing to say, "She has two sons and a daughter and grandchildren and brothers."  The question is asked, "Why do not her children take care of their aged mother in her feebleness?"  I am not able to answer that question, but perhaps you can answer it.{DG 199.1}

I have my work, which is speaking and writing. I am in constant labor and ought not to have one thought or one care upon my soul for your mother. I have invested twenty-five dollars for clothing because your mother needed it. I have ordered wood for the winter because last winter I learned she lay abed hours in the daytime to save burning wood. The little money she has on hand, she is reluctant to use, thinking she might be sick for some time like her mother, and she dreads becoming a pauper. I cannot blame her for this, for judging from the past, she may feel she cannot depend at all on her children.{DG 199.2}

 

 

 

In an interview, one Rabbi Rachel Cowan commented about societies attitude with older people:

Our Culture Promotes A Declinist Paradigm Of Aging

Quote

 

Our society doesn’t really like old people. People tend to deny that they are getting older because, as they age, they feel more invisible, irrelevant, and insecure. Our culture is based upon productivity, ambition, and succeeding, and getting ahead. So, when you are no longer productive in a career, then others tend to see you as having less value and as a kind of hindrance

Rabbi Rachel Cowan, www.spiritualityhealth.com/articles/not-written-stone

 

Generally, we live in a culture where a declinist paradigm of aging is promoted. Does the Church follow the same paradigm in not giving our elderly members the support that they need? Is there any difference between the church and the rest of the world in this matter?

In considering the above EGW quote I supplied, I have wondered if perhaps, Ellen White was playing the part of an “enabler” in regards to the dysfunctional prospect of the sister-inlaw not stepping up to the plate and supporting her mother? I would be interested to discuss some of the points brought out by that quote. Why did Ellen White wait so long in going after the sister inlaw? It seems like things have not changed much over the years, and that the elderly are far too often going without basic needs being met, because they can no longer “produce” or “work” and so they are devalued into a class that is, in effect, second class.. Do we really follow the scriptures here and “have a tender regard for the elderly?”

 

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Well, I can't speak for the church, only myself. I am currently caring for my elderly grandmother. I live with her 22 hours a day and it's taking a huge strain on me and my family. I can tell you how I *feel* about the lack of support she gets from anyone else: spiteful. 

If you think that *someone* will care for the elderly among you, you are probably wrong. There are few people willing to make the sacrifices necessary. 

I, personally, am unimpressed by EGWs statements. It is apparent to me that she was only willing to sacrifice so much.

(I fully expect no one to agree with me. It's okay.)

 

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20 hours ago, Aubrey said:

Well, I can't speak for the church, only myself. I am currently caring for my elderly grandmother. I live with her 22 hours a day and it's taking a huge strain on me and my family. I can tell you how I *feel* about the lack of support she gets from anyone else: spiteful. 

If you think that *someone* will care for the elderly among you, you are probably wrong. There are few people willing to make the sacrifices necessary. 

I, personally, am unimpressed by EGWs statements. It is apparent to me that she was only willing to sacrifice so much.

(I fully expect no one to agree with me. It's okay.)

 

First of all, I'm writing this as someone who spends a lot of time helping my parents and my aging grandmother...

I believe Sister White did all she could to help her sister-in-law, but she had a responsibility towards the Church that she didn't dare to neglect. She had to travel far and wide in order to preach the messages that God gave her. It wasn't her duty to stay at home in order to care for this lady, during the 1800's this was largely the responsibility of the children. I also think Ellen White is very polite and guarded in the letter to her niece, given the circumstances she didn't ask too much of her. Sister White took many people into her home over the years, (also after these events) so this hasn't got anything to do with her willingness to sacrifice, she just realized that it was difficult to care for this lady and fulfill her God-given call at the same time. She wanted the best for her sister-in-law, and she saw that she needed more help than she was able to provide.

Anyways, about your situation with your grandmother... I'm not too familiar with the health-care system over in the US, but if your grandmother is in need of continual care, then perhaps you guys should consider finding a place at a nursing home for her? Just a thought, of course I don't know the details of her condition or her economical situation. But sometimes elderly people are in need of assistance 24/7, and in such cases it is no defeat to let professionals care for them.

 

 

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I agree with you, but unfortunately I wont be back to the forum to discuss further.

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1 hour ago, Unchained said:

But sometimes elderly people are in need of assistance 24/7, and in such cases it is no defeat to let professionals care for them.

 

 

1

It's not defeatist, I agree. But I want her to have better care than what the "professionals" give. They try--they try hard--but they make mistakes that often go unnoticed until it's too late. I am convinced that my grandmother gets better care from me than she would at a nursing home or assisted living. In March, she broke her hip and had to have emergency surgery. From the moment the EMTs released her to the hospital 'til the day I brought her home two months later, not a single person who was involved in her care did so without making an error of one sort or another. Not the surgeon, the anesthetist, the nurses, the pharmacists, the resident physicians, admissions nurses, PT/OT/ST, aides, transport, dietician, meal service, even billing and housekeeping--not a one did their job error-free; and not a day went by that I did not need to call them out on their errors.

It worries me that there are so many elderly people who do not have someone advocating for them full-time. It has certainly been an eye-opener to me. 

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2 minutes ago, The Wanderer said:

I agree with you, but unfortunately I wont be back to the forum to discuss further.

Sorry to see you go, Wanderer. Perhaps one day you'll return. Godspeed in your journeys through this life!

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In the opening post The Wanderer cited a sentence from Chapter 266 of Reflecting Christ and then cites an OT passage as coming from the NIV.

The Wanderer has accurately cited the reference, however, I have a problem with what he has posted:

1)  It cannot be said that the verse EGW used came from the NIV.  It did not.  As a matter of fact, the NIV was produced decades after the death of EGW.  Unless one would want to say that God gave EGW a prophetic view of what the NIV would say decades after her death, it would be impossible for her to have cited a verse from the NIV.

2)  The book REFLECTING CHIRST  was first published in 2009.  IOW, it was first published a bit less than 100 years after the death of EGW.

As I said, The Wanderer did accurately cite the reference.  But, The Wanderer did not consider the context in what the cited reference was written.

The book REFLECTING CHRIST is a compliation abstracted from the writings of EGW after some editoral work has been applied to them.  It was these people who decided to quote from the NIV.  EGW could not  have done so.

We should not consider the EGW Estate to be deceptive.  When they published REFLECTING CHIRST They made a statement that I will quote below.  If The Wanderer had considered that statement and cited it in the opening post it would have had less of a potential for misunderstanding.

 

This volume is the fourteenth book of day-by-day devotional readings to be published from the pen of Ellen G. White. This establishes a new record in the Seventh-day Adventist Church, and probably is a record also in the Christian world at large. Ellen White's writings are at once so voluminous, so Christ-centered, and so practical that they continue to provide an almost endless source of materials that are admirably suited for devotional reading.

During her seventy-year ministry the author spoke, through her pen, to young people, to church members, and to the world in the Youth's Instructor, Review and Herald, and Signs of the Times. Selections for this book have been drawn from these three periodicals as well as from her books and previously unpublished manuscripts and letters.

In order to bring each reading within the compass of a single page, frequent deletions have been necessary. Such omissions are indicated by marks of ellipsis. In every instance great care has been exercised to preserve without distortion the thought and intent of the writer. Reflecting Christ—the title of this book—is a theme that recurs constantly through the writings of Ellen White. Loving the Lord deeply, the author earnestly endeavored to walk in his footsteps herself, and she ever encouraged others to look to Christ as their example. Underlining the theme of this book, she wrote: “When those who profess to serve God follow Christ's example, practicing the principles of the law in their daily life; when every act bears witness that they love God supremely and their neighbor as themselves, then will the church have power to move the world.”—Christ's Object Lessons, 340.

Reflecting Christ—this should be every Christian's highest goal. The pursuit of this objective, under the impetus of the indwelling spirit of God and the grace of Christ, can bring with it only peace and true happiness.

That the meditations in this book may aid and encourage each reader in his or her walk with the Lord is the fervent prayer of

The Trustees of the Ellen G. White Estate

Washington, D.C.

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.

Edited by Aubrey
changed my mind
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37 minutes ago, Gregory Matthews said:

In the opening post The Wanderer cited a sentence from Chapter 266 of Reflecting Christ and then cites an OT passage as coming from the NIV.

The Wanderer has accurately cited the reference, however, I have a problem with what he has posted:

1)  It cannot be said that the verse EGW used came from the NIV.  It did not.  As a matter of fact, the NIV was produced decades after the death of EGW.  Unless one would want to say that God gave EGW a prophetic view of what the NIV would say decades after her death, it would be impossible for her to have cited a verse from the NIV.

2)  The book REFLECTING CHIRST  was first published in 2009.  IOW, it was first published a bit less than 100 years after the death of EGW.

As I said, The Wanderer did accurately cite the reference.  But, The Wanderer did not consider the context in what the cited reference was written.

The book REFLECTING CHRIST is a compliation abstracted from the writings of EGW after some editoral work has been applied to them.  It was these people who decided to quote from the NIV.  EGW could not  have done so.

We should not consider the EGW Estate to be deceptive.  When they published REFLECTING CHIRST They made a statement that I will quote below.  If The Wanderer had considered that statement and cited it in the opening post it would have had less of a potential for misunderstanding.

 

 

Gregory, once again you atempt to defame a forum member's intergrity. If you had done your own home work, you would have seen that I quoted verbatim from the official EGW disk available at any ABC  I did not misquote or create any "misunderstanding" here. My point, and my questions remain valid as it does not matter which version that text in lev is from The same point is easily made in any other Bible version.

Another example of why I am leaving. Too many big mouths here

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in doing a bit of research on the letter that Ellen White wrote to Adeline Chase Savage regarding Mary White Chase, the letter was written in 1884, three years after James White had died.  Mary had come to Battle Creek without any of her children in the late 1860s, her husband having died in the 1850s.  Her children all lived over 700 miles away from Battle Creek — some in Maine, some in Boston, some elsewhere.  It doesn't appear that any were SDA, but I might be wrong... the reason I think it could be, is because none of her children were listed in Mary White Chase's Review and Herald obituary from 1889, which was highly unusual.  Perhaps they didn't want anything to do with her.  Maybe she "preached" at them.  Or perhaps one or more of the children *had* offered Mary Chase a home after her husband died.

Maybe Ellen White didn't know the full story of Mary's relationship with her children.  Hard to know all the circumstances.  But probably the letter from Mrs White to Adeline Savage wasn't taken kindly.

Mary White Chase died of pneumonia in 1889.  

 

 

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I was clear in what I said.  As I said twice, you accurately quoted, but you did not consider the context.  Because of that, people reading your post could misunderstand what was posted.

By the way: So, that all reading this thread will know,  I have attempted to contact you directly and privately.  If you have not already done so, read your e-mail.

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3 hours ago, Gregory Matthews said:

I was clear in what I said.  As I said twice, you accurately quoted, but you did not consider the context.  Because of that, people reading your post could misunderstand what was posted.

By the way: So, that all reading this thread will know,  I have attempted to contact you directly and privately.  If you have not already done so, read your e-mail.

You are now also lying to the public. So all will know, no attempt was made to privately contact me AND to allow me to respond. As soon as i saw the email come in about this; I did not open it; because I chose to come here and see what was going on and Gregories post was already here. This does not constitute in any way "direct" or "private" contact. I had no chance of any kind to respond to the ridiculous tirade  posted by Gregory. And the reason you have not said what this big "misunderstanding" is that my posting and citation has caused is because there is none. The correct context is pretty clear no matter what version one would choose for that text.  I am pretty sure I understand the church  history and writings atleast as well if not better than you. I have over 25 years of study in that department under my belt. I knew full well everything you posted above when i made the OP. Trying to turn this into a turkey shoot and make it look like I "did not consider' some context you say is so badly needed is so far off the mark that all I can conclude is this was simply the kind of direct harassment and attacking that you so piously denounce in others all the time on this forum. I am asking you to never contact me personally for any reason again. I want nothing to do with you and your greasy little game playing here

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The KJV, which Ellen White would most likely have quoted for this text, has "Thou shalt rise up before the hoary head, and honour the face of the old man, and fear thy God: I am the LORD."  That is the version used in the Adventist Home (1952) compilation:

Be Patient With Infirmities.--Especially dreadful is the thought of a child turning in hatred upon a mother who has become old and feeble, upon whom has come those infirmities of disposition attendant upon second childhood. How patiently, how tenderly, should children bear with such a mother! Tender words which will not irritate the spirit should be spoken. A true Christian will never be unkind, never under any circumstances be neglectful of his father or mother, but will heed the command, "Honour thy father and thy mother." God has said, "Thou shalt rise up before the hoary head, and honour the face of the old man." . . .  {AH 362.3}

And it is the version used in the book Education (1903):

And God has especially enjoined tender respect toward the aged. He says, "The hoary head is a crown of glory, if it be found in the way of righteousness." Proverbs 16:31. It tells of battles fought, and victories gained; of burdens borne, and temptations resisted. It tells of weary feet nearing their rest, of places soon to be vacant. Help the children to think of this, and they will smooth the path of the aged by their courtesy and respect, and will bring grace and beauty into their young lives as they heed the command to "rise up before the hoary head, and honor the face of the old man." Leviticus 19:32.  {Ed 244.4}  

While I prefer the imagery of the KJV, owing to its additional symbolic ramifications that are lost in the NIV, I feel, for this particular theme, the principal criticism I would have is simply the implication that Ellen White would have endorsed what I have long called the not-inspired version.  The NIV is riddled with theological fallacies calculated to lead people away from the track of truth.  It is not an honest translation, and I can hardly bear to see our church using it so frequently.

Yet for this verse, and context, I see no reason to object so vehemently as Gregory has chosen to do.  In fact, I was quite surprised to see Gregory making these comments about the quotation of the NIV, in light of his pro-NIV statements which I have seen him make in the past.  

 

Wanderer made a comment regarding respecting the elderly, and quoted from a modern compilation of Ellen White's writings to support his viewpoint.

Gregory, without addressing either Wanderer's main point, or the particular theological error introduced by the use of the NIV, objected to Wanderer's post.

Now the argument has flared up into a volcano out of a molehill.

Who benefits by this?  

 

Wanderer, I appreciated the topic, and I think it is a good subject for Adventists to be thinking about.  How should we regard the elderly?

In Asia, the elderly get much, much more respect.  America could learn from Asians.

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To everyone reading this:

Green is correct that I did not address either of the points that The Wanderer mentioned.  And, he is correct that a molehill has become a volcano.

The points that I wanted to be made was that:

1)  Some people might think that The Wanderer was saying that EGW    quoted from the NIV, which was impossible since the NIV did not exist during the  life of EGW.

2)  Some people might think that the passage which The Wanderer cited was a direct quote from a work written and edited by EGW.  This would be a mistaken thought.  Actually the book was a 2009 production by the EGW Estate and that work included editorial work by the EGW Estate.

3)  I consider it to be important for the person reading the writings of today to clearly understand exactly what EGW wrote and what may   have been compiled and/or edited by others.   Included in this is knowing exactly what version of the Bible EGW used and not think that she used a modern version which did not exist at the time she wrote.

4)  I personally believe that The Wanderer could have been more clear on these points.  But, I was very clear that he was accurate in his quotation, regardless of his posting it in a manner that was  potentially confusing to others.

 

By the way, Green, and anyone else, As I did not directly address that main points of The Wanderer's post, I did not address them in my direct and private message to him.  Rather, I stated that I wanted to treat him fairly.  I had noted that he had stated that he was leaving CA and would not return.  So, I wanted him to know that I  had posted a response to his post.  I thought it fair to tell him that I had posted a response and to tell him exactly what I had posted, which I did.

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I am so sorry to see The Wanderer leave. I fully understand his frustrations with his posts being "corrected" over and over again. I hope that one day he will choose to visit again.

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On 9/1/2016 at 10:07 PM, Aubrey said:

Well, I can't speak for the church, only myself. I am currently caring for my elderly grandmother. I live with her 22 hours a day and it's taking a huge strain on me and my family. I can tell you how I *feel* about the lack of support she gets from anyone else: spiteful. 

If you think that *someone* will care for the elderly among you, you are probably wrong. There are few people willing to make the sacrifices necessary. 

I, personally, am unimpressed by EGWs statements. It is apparent to me that she was only willing to sacrifice so much.

(I fully expect no one to agree with me. It's okay.)

 

I do think that in general the "church" does an ok job taking care of the elderly. Having said that, I think that"church" to me means, the individuals of said "church." Personally I would say that the corporate "church" really can't do much if the individual members don't do anything. There are a number of nursing homes that are run by the "church," I believe? Not sure if they are under the General Conference or just under local conference's? That do a pretty good job. But institutions will never do the job that individuals can do! I've been taking care of my Mom on and off these past 5 years. Its not easy, especially when also taking care of my grandchildren. As far as EGW, she's like a pastor, pastors personally don't take care of the sick, that would be the members job. At least that's what I believe. I agree that no one else will ever do the job of taking care of family better than we do!!

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17 hours ago, Aubrey said:

It's not defeatist, I agree. But I want her to have better care than what the "professionals" give. They try--they try hard--but they make mistakes that often go unnoticed until it's too late. I am convinced that my grandmother gets better care from me than she would at a nursing home or assisted living. In March, she broke her hip and had to have emergency surgery. From the moment the EMTs released her to the hospital 'til the day I brought her home two months later, not a single person who was involved in her care did so without making an error of one sort or another. Not the surgeon, the anesthetist, the nurses, the pharmacists, the resident physicians, admissions nurses, PT/OT/ST, aides, transport, dietician, meal service, even billing and housekeeping--not a one did their job error-free; and not a day went by that I did not need to call them out on their errors.

It worries me that there are so many elderly people who do not have someone advocating for them full-time. It has certainly been an eye-opener to me. 

Well, it certainly sounds as if you are very dedicated when it comes to caring for your grandmother. Praying for the Lord to give you and your family strength, patience and love. I personally know that caring for family members with a frail health can be challenging on so many different levels, so I believe you when you write that this is putting a strain on you and your family. May God bless you all!

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16 hours ago, rudywoofs (Pam) said:

in doing a bit of research on the letter that Ellen White wrote to Adeline Chase Savage regarding Mary White Chase, the letter was written in 1884, three years after James White had died.  Mary had come to Battle Creek without any of her children in the late 1860s, her husband having died in the 1850s.  Her children all lived over 700 miles away from Battle Creek — some in Maine, some in Boston, some elsewhere.  It doesn't appear that any were SDA, but I might be wrong... the reason I think it could be, is because none of her children were listed in Mary White Chase's Review and Herald obituary from 1889, which was highly unusual.  Perhaps they didn't want anything to do with her.  Maybe she "preached" at them.  Or perhaps one or more of the children *had* offered Mary Chase a home after her husband died.

Maybe Ellen White didn't know the full story of Mary's relationship with her children.  Hard to know all the circumstances.  But probably the letter from Mrs White to Adeline Savage wasn't taken kindly.

Mary White Chase died of pneumonia in 1889.  

 

 

Very interesting, and thanks for posting! This is a story I really would love to know more about.

Since we already are speculating I’d like to add another possibility to your list. ;) I don’t think it’s implausible that Ellen White discussed this with her sister-in-law before sending this letter, so perhaps Mary was the one sorely missing her children? Perhaps Ellen White was interceding on behalf of Mary, who longed to see her children and grandchildren? Just a thought, I could of course be wrong about this!

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4 hours ago, Aubrey said:

I am so sorry to see The Wanderer leave. I fully understand his frustrations with his posts being "corrected" over and over again. I hope that one day he will choose to visit again.

So am I. But he should also take his own advice from his own OP about regarding the elderly!!

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Yes. It's hard to remember who the elderly are here among us though. I have to keep reminding myself that many here are 20 years (or more!) older than I.

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21 minutes ago, Aubrey said:

Yes. It's hard to remember who the elderly are here among us though. I have to keep reminding myself that many here are 20 years (or more!) older than I.

I'm only 14 years older than you Aubrey... so I guess I don't quite make the "elderly" cut, yet! :)   What bothers me, sort of, are some of the folks (usually men) on here who say they're really old, but it turns out I'm older than they are.  LOL  

My mom will be 91 in a few months...she still lives in the family home, drives, and generally manages pretty well.  But I check up on her every morning (she loves to see her "grand dog"), do most of her shopping, mow the 1/4 acre yard every week (ugh!!!), do her gardening, and take her to any medical appointments she might have.  It's my aim to keep her in her own home for as long as possible. 

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Sounds like you're doing a great job! I hope and pray it continues to go so well, I sincerely do!

 

My grandmother was doing just as well at 91, up until she *wasn't* just as well. She drove off to IHOP on the afternoon of Dec 23rd last year (a 1 mile trip she made everyday for 10+ years), and ended up lost near Chicago 23 hours after she was last seen in St. Louis. She drove that whole time until the winds from a tornado blew her into a ditch. She had given us no indication that her memory and ability to reason were that impaired. It was as if a switch had been flipped. At that time, I stepped in to care for her during the days for 5 or 6 hours a time (and took away the car keys).  When she fell in March and broke her hip, my hours went up to 22 hours a day with her. She'd love to stay at her home forever, but we're now trying to figure out a way to move her in with us. It's going to be a crowded house with 5 adults! :)

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On 9/3/2016 at 9:11 AM, phkrause said:

I do think that in general the "church" does an ok job taking care of the elderly. Having said that, I think that"church" to me means, the individuals of said "church." Personally I would say that the corporate "church" really can't do much if the individual members don't do anything. There are a number of nursing homes that are run by the "church," I believe? Not sure if they are under the General Conference or just under local conference's? That do a pretty good job. But institutions will never do the job that individuals can do! I've been taking care of my Mom on and off these past 5 years. Its not easy, especially when also taking care of my grandchildren. As far as EGW, she's like a pastor, pastors personally don't take care of the sick, that would be the members job. At least that's what I believe. I agree that no one else will ever do the job of taking care of family better than we do!!

Being unfortunate in having to see my spouse succumb to lewy-dementia, I can say no one, be they individuals or corporate church body will ever have to take care of my long time lover until such time as my own faculties are insufficient to meet her needs, which at this point both of us continue to find fulfilling, praise be to God that Jesus still speaks to both of us, after 39 years of being together, at least partially a result of asking Him for the grace necessary. The URL below answers many if not all of our questions for the future.

Every individual has to answer for the choices they make in a world often times appearing to have lost all semblance of sanity.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl6fU9p8Ptc

God is Love!~Jesus saves! :D

 

 

Aubrey, Gail, rudywoofs (Pam) and 2 others like this

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On 9/1/2016 at 8:07 PM, Aubrey said:

Well, I can't speak for the church, only myself. I am currently caring for my elderly grandmother. I live with her 22 hours a day and it's taking a huge strain on me and my family. I can tell you how I *feel* about the lack of support she gets from anyone else: spiteful. 

If you think that *someone* will care for the elderly among you, you are probably wrong. There are few people willing to make the sacrifices necessary. 

I, personally, am unimpressed by EGWs statements. It is apparent to me that she was only willing to sacrifice so much.

(I fully expect no one to agree with me. It's okay.)

 

In another post, i will point out more of what i am talking about; however, I decidedly chose not to call my citation "by Ellen G White,"  for many good reasons. I simply cited where I got them, which is the only thing pertinent to the OP. Your statement about the difficulties that the elderly, was also touched on by the RC quote I cited in many different ways, not uncommon, apparently, in many circles of today's modern church.

To those who have contributed personal stories, meaningful stories, in keeping with the OP I thank you. That's all I wanted. Just to compare notes with others. I think this can be a fruitful topic that will be helpful to many people.

I think there were some better choices EGW could have and should have made, according to what was stated in  the quote in the OP, but I am almost out of internet time for tonight and wanted to enclose the following for all those who labor as a family caregiver, I know what it is like, sometimes its not with an elderly but someone sick and bedridden with cancer.

IMG_2469a.jpg

Will look forward to hearing more stories/testimonies that are leaning towards, either the problems being encountered and/or the successes happening. The Church's role in same should be a welcome are to post about here as well. Anything thats in regard to the op. Well; Beep! Beep! That's all for tonight.

Aubrey and phkrause like this

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